Stories from our staff

We spoke to some of our brilliant support workers to find out what it’s really like working in social care, and they’d like to share their stories with you.

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Hobbies, activities and having fun together

Gemma describes her job as “fresh, exciting, rewarding, satisfying and enjoyable”; and it’s easy to see why.

The people she supports like doing lots of activities. From dance lessons to trips to the theatre, you can often find them swimming, enjoying lunch with friends and spending time at the seaside.

“I feel tremendously valued by the people I support and I can tell by their smiles, when they see me, that I’ve made them feel fulfilled.”

Working up from support worker to operations director

After Nicky joined Dimensions as a support worker she excelled in her career and steadily moved up to become one of our operations directors.

Nicky was supported to study qualifications and go on a variety of training courses. She was a support worker for two years, before being promoted to senior support worker, deputy home manager, team leader, performance coach and finally operations director where she helped oversee support operations across a whole region.

“I decided to take a year out to earn some money and saw an advert in a paper for support workers…it was with Dimensions and that was 20 years ago.”

Constructing a new career

Mark left university and worked in construction for six years. He’s now been working in care for nine.

As part of his role he learnt Makaton (a communication tool) to help communicate with the person he supports. Now you can find him teaching Makaton workshops.

“I feel as though Dimensions has put its faith in me.”

Working as a team to cope with a terminal illness

There can be hard times as a support worker too, and it’s important to reach out to your colleagues as a support network. Anne had to go through a very difficult experience.

“Someone I supported was diagnosed with a terminal illness and we were told she’d have to go to a hospice or stay with us. We knew she wouldn’t cope in a hospice and, as a team, we kept her in her home. She was happy right until the end… Everybody looked out for each other.”

What it takes to be a good support worker

Ailish believes anyone can be a support worker, but to be a good support worker you need something special and not everyone understands what it takes.

“No two days are the same [being a support worker]. I often go home, get in my car and think; I love my job. If someone told me it isn’t a meaningful role, I would invite them to learn more about it.

“Anyone can be a support worker, but to be a good support worker you need to have a kind and caring nature, and also be resilient. It can be hard, but you have a support network and you can ask for help.”

A career where you can see the difference you’re making

Lorna has set up a number of services and loves to see how the people her teams support grow and start to achieve amazing things.

“I love my job. I love working with the people I support. I love how they develop within themselves and how they can come to us with very few skills and within two years they’re cooking a roast dinner for their family and they’re part of great big things in the community. All because we’ve supported them to do that.”

Feeling inspired?

These are just some of the life changing stories our amazing support workers could share with you.

If you feel like you too could change someone’s life, find out more about working with us and how we can reward you for this incredible journey.

Browse our national job vacancies.